Iranian Music – Afarin Rahmanifar http://afarin-rahmanifar.com/ Sat, 25 Sep 2021 10:49:56 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.8 http://afarin-rahmanifar.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/05/afarin-rahmanifar-icon-150x150.png Iranian Music – Afarin Rahmanifar http://afarin-rahmanifar.com/ 32 32 Under the Taliban, the flourishing Afghan music scene falls silent | http://afarin-rahmanifar.com/under-the-taliban-the-flourishing-afghan-music-scene-falls-silent/ http://afarin-rahmanifar.com/under-the-taliban-the-flourishing-afghan-music-scene-falls-silent/#respond Sat, 25 Sep 2021 02:59:00 +0000 http://afarin-rahmanifar.com/under-the-taliban-the-flourishing-afghan-music-scene-falls-silent/

KABUL, Afghanistan (AP) – A month after the Taliban seized power in Afghanistan, the music is calming down.

The last time the militant group ruled the country, in the late 1990s, they banned music altogether. So far this time, the government set up by the Taliban has not officially taken this step. But already, musicians fear a ban is coming, and some Taliban fighters on the ground have started enforcing the rules on their own, harassing musicians and concert halls.

Many wedding venues limit music at their gatherings. Musicians are afraid to perform. At least one reported that Taliban fighters at one of the many checkpoints around the capital smashed his instrument. Drivers silence their radios whenever they see a Taliban checkpoint.

In the alleys of Kharabat, a district of the old city of Kabul, families where music is a profession passed down from generation to generation are looking for ways to leave the country. The profession has already been hit hard by the collapse of the Afghan economy, as well as the coronavirus pandemic, and some families now too fearful to work are selling furniture to get by.

“The current situation is oppressive,” said Muzafar Bakhsh, a 21-year-old who has played in an alliance. His family had just sold some of their belongings at Kabul’s new flea market, Chaman-e-Hozari. “We keep selling them … so as not to starve,” said Bakhsh, whose late grandfather was Ustad Rahim Bakhsh, a famous ustad – or maestro – of classical Afghan music.

Afghanistan has a strong musical tradition, influenced by Iranian and Indian classical music. It also has a thriving pop music scene, adding electronic instruments and dance beats to more traditional beats. Both have flourished over the past 20 years.

When asked if the Taliban government would ban music again, spokesman Bilal Karimi told The Associated Press: “At the moment it is under consideration and when a final decision will be made. , the Islamic Emirate will announce it ”.

But concert halls are already feeling the pressure since the Taliban invaded Kabul on August 15.

Wedding halls are usually the scene of large gatherings with music and dance, usually separated between the male and female sections. In three rooms visited by the AP, staff said the same. Taliban fighters often show up, and although they haven’t yet objected to the music, their presence is intimidating. The musicians refuse to introduce themselves. In the male sections of weddings, the rooms no longer have live music or DJs. In the women’s section – where Taliban fighters have less access – sometimes female DJs still play.

Some karaoke lounges have closed. Others still face harassment. A lounge visited by the AP stopped karaoke but remained open, serving water pipes and playing recorded music. Last week, Taliban fighters showed up, smashed an accordion and tore up signs and stickers referring to music or karaoke. A few days later, they returned and told the customers to leave immediately.

Many musicians apply for visas abroad.

In the family home of another ustad in Kharabat, everyone is ready to leave when they can. In one room, a group of musicians recently gathered, drinking tea and discussing the situation. They shared photos and videos of their performances across the world – Moscow, Baku, New Delhi, Dubai, New York.

“Musicians no longer have their place here. We have to leave. The love and affection of the past few years is gone, ”said a drummer, whose career spanned 35 years and who is the master of a leading music education center in Kabul. Like many other musicians, he spoke on condition of not being named, fearing retaliation from the Taliban.

Another musician in the room said the Taliban broke a keyboard worth $ 3,000 when they saw him in his car as he passed through a checkpoint. Others said they were shipping their most valuable instruments out of the country or hiding them. One had taken down his tabla – a sort of drum – and hid the pieces in different places. Another buried his rebab, a stringed instrument, in his yard. Some said they were hiding instruments behind false walls.

One who has already managed to leave is Aryana Sayeed, a prominent female pop star who has also been a judge on the TV show “The Voice of Afghanistan”. Already accustomed to death threats from the Islamic hard line, Sayeed decided to escape the day the Taliban took control of Kabul.

“I had to survive and be the voice of other women in Afghanistan,” said Sayeed, now in Istanbul. She said she is asking Turkish authorities to help other musicians leave her homeland. “The Taliban are not friends of Afghanistan, they are our enemies. Only enemies would want to destroy your story and your music, ”she said.

At the Afghan National Institute of Music, most of the classrooms are empty. None of the teachers or the 350 students have returned since the resumption. The institute was once famous for its inclusiveness and has emerged as the face of a new Afghanistan. Now it is guarded by fighters from the Haqqani network, a Taliban ally considered a terrorist group by the United States.

Inside the institute, photos of playing boys and girls hang on the walls, dusty pianos lie in locked rooms, and some instruments have been stacked in a container on the school patio. Fighters guarding the site said they were awaiting orders from management on what to do with them.

“We’re not interested in listening to these things,” said one fighter, standing next to a set of dhambura, a traditional stringed instrument. “I don’t even know what these items are. Personally, I have never listened to them and that does not interest me.

In a classroom at the end of the hall, a Taliban fighter rested on a mattress while listening to a male voice sing on his cell phone, apparently one of the instrumentless religious hymns common to the group.

Back in Kharabat, Mohammed Ibrahim Afzali once ran the family musical instrument repair business. In mid-August, he puts away his tools, breaks the instruments left in the workshop and closes. Today, the 61-year-old sells crisps and snacks to help feed his family of 13.

“I made this little shop. God is merciful and we will find a piece of bread, ”he said.

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Reviews | The January 6 plotters had a crowd. They also had the Eastman plan. http://afarin-rahmanifar.com/reviews-the-january-6-plotters-had-a-crowd-they-also-had-the-eastman-plan/ http://afarin-rahmanifar.com/reviews-the-january-6-plotters-had-a-crowd-they-also-had-the-eastman-plan/#respond Fri, 24 Sep 2021 09:00:21 +0000 http://afarin-rahmanifar.com/reviews-the-january-6-plotters-had-a-crowd-they-also-had-the-eastman-plan/

What happens to the politics of this regime. Had Pence broken by the rules and history and taken control of the counting process, House Speaker Nancy Pelosi would likely have suspended the joint session, which relies on the consent of both houses of Congress. “With a blocked and incomplete count due to a stalemate between Pence and Pelosi”, lawyer Ned Foley writing in a separate electoral law blog post, “Twentieth Amendment becomes relevant constitutional provision.” Which means, in short, that by noon on January 20, Pelosi would become interim president of the United States. Pence would lose his authority as Vice President (and Speaker of the Senate) and the joint session would resume, with Congress affixing its seal of approval to Biden’s victory.

And let’s not forget that a series of such moves Eastman envisioned would spark national outrage. The “screams” wouldn’t come just from Congressional Democrats; they would come from the 81 million voters whom Pence would have summarily deprived of the right to vote. It is conceivable that Trump and his allies prevailed over mass protests and civil disobedience. But that would depend on military support, which, if General Mark Milley’s actions were any indication, would not have been available.

None of this should make you feel good or give you a sigh of relief. Consider what we know. A prominent and respected member in good standing of the conservative legal establishment – Eastman is a registered Federalist Society and clerk for Supreme Court Justice Clarence Thomas – plotted with the president and his Republican Party allies to overturn the election and overthrow American democracy under the Constitution. Yes, they failed to keep Trump in power, but they did manage to turn the pro forma counting process into an opportunity for real political struggle.

It has always been possible, in theory, to manipulate the rules to seize the power of the voters. Now that’s a live option. And with the right pieces in place, Trump could be successful. All he needs is a rival list of electoral votes from contested states, representatives of state and state legislatures ready to speak on his behalf, a favorable Republican majority in the either house of Congress and a sufficiently flexible majority of the Supreme Court.

As it turns out, Trump may well run for president in 2024 (he’s already racking up a big war chest) with exactly that board in play. Republican state legislatures in states like Georgia and Arizona have, for example, used fraud allegations to take control key areas of electoral administration. Likewise, according to Reuters, 10 of the 15 Republican candidates declared for secretary of state in five swing states – Arizona, Georgia, Wisconsin, Michigan and Nevada – either declared the 2020 election stolen or asked authorities to invalidate the results in their states. It is also not unlikely that a Republican Party led by pro-Trump fanatics will win Congress in November next year and hold it until the presidential election and until 2025.

If Trump is, once again, on the ballot, then the election could turn on the handling of a ceremony that was, until now, just a formality.

Here I will go back to where I started. If that happened, it would be revolutionary change. In this world, voters, filtered by the Electoral College, no longer choose the president. It is less a question of the rule of law than of power, of who occupies the right positions at the right time, and above all, who can bring the military to their side.

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Thousands of Haitian migrants remain in the United States http://afarin-rahmanifar.com/thousands-of-haitian-migrants-remain-in-the-united-states/ http://afarin-rahmanifar.com/thousands-of-haitian-migrants-remain-in-the-united-states/#respond Thu, 23 Sep 2021 23:35:26 +0000 http://afarin-rahmanifar.com/thousands-of-haitian-migrants-remain-in-the-united-states/

“At least 25 percent of families include pregnant women,” Mr. Villarreal said. “Some of them have been traveling for weeks from South America in extremely difficult conditions.”

Families are tested for Covid-19 upon arrival at the Houston shelter and are then given a change of food, water and underwear, in addition to access to showers and beds.

“Some of our families have been traveling for weeks, not bathing, not eating properly, without access to feminine hygiene products,” Villarreal said.

From Houston, many families, who typically stay less than 24 hours at Mr. Villarreal’s shelter, then travel to places in the United States where their loved ones live. Relatives have to pay for the plane ticket, but volunteers have mobilized to do so if this is not possible.

Mr. Isaac, his young son in his arms, left Haiti in 2017, fleeing what he said was a never-ending cycle of violence, poverty and natural disasters. In Chile he met his wife and they had a son, Hans, who was burned in an accident and needs medical attention. There he worked in construction, hospitality and food service, and he said he planned to look for similar jobs in New York City.

He and his wife hadn’t planned it that way, but Hans celebrated his second birthday on Wednesday – at an American airport that was their near the end of what had been a very long trip.

“I felt bad because we all came here for the same reasons,” he said of the many Haitian migrants he met in Del Rio. “I knew not everyone was going to get away with this. We were lucky.

James dobbins contributed to Del Rio reporting, and Eileen Sullivan and Zolan Kanno-Youngs from Washington.

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Nevermind at 30: How the Nirvana album rocked the world http://afarin-rahmanifar.com/nevermind-at-30-how-the-nirvana-album-rocked-the-world/ http://afarin-rahmanifar.com/nevermind-at-30-how-the-nirvana-album-rocked-the-world/#respond Thu, 23 Sep 2021 08:46:52 +0000 http://afarin-rahmanifar.com/nevermind-at-30-how-the-nirvana-album-rocked-the-world/

When Nirvana released Nevermind in September 1991 (on major label Geffen, following the band’s emergence on Seattle indie SubPop), the album’s explosive success followed a European tour and was a shock to the mainstream system (the Chairman of Geffen, Ed Rosenblatt described it as “one of those discs ‘get out of the way and dodge'”). Back on the Seattle DIY scene, the mood was less festive: “My memory of Nevermind is that it looked like betrayal,” Keshavarz says. “People were protective because Nirvana was representative of a community and so many ideas. Looking back, I have great sympathy for the band, because I think they rightfully made some great music that touched the people’s hearts. In fact, I remember visiting Iran shortly after Nevermind came out and smuggled some tapes to play to friends and relatives; you would see their faces, like, “What? -what it is ? Pretty cool… can I get a copy? “

“But in Seattle at the time, people were very upset; it was this DIY ethic that believed you couldn’t achieve release through a major label. We knew the rents and prices of tickets were going to go up, and we were really protective of our spaces Kurt would come to the Old Fire House a lot and stay calm in a corner; he was a gentle soul, and everyone loved him – yet sometimes he wasn’t. not welcome, depending on who was playing, because the anger was building up were high.That must have been hurtful.

Global reverbs

Nevermind is said to have sold over 30 million copies worldwide, making it one of the biggest albums in music history. It also arguably forged a sort of globalized youth culture, fueled by the growing reach of MTV (which had its videos, including Smells Like Teen Spirit, on high rotation). Brazilian cultural studies academic Moyses Pinto, now a professor at the Lutheran University of Porto Alegre, was struck by Nevermind’s initial exit at the age of 11. ” he says.

Neto points out that Brazil’s military dictatorship (1964-1985) inspired many rebellious musicians, including pysch-rockers Os Mutantes (one of Cobain’s favorite bands). The end of the dictatorship extended the range of rock, punk and post-punk sounds in Brazil, although Neto describes a “time lag” between international influences, before the Nevermind era: “We had punks in Brazil , but almost a decade after their heyday in the UK and US – and there was 80s pop culture and mainstream arena groups, ”says Neto. “But the impact of Nirvana and MTV made it synchronized; a new youth – including me – started hearing the same music and wearing the same styles; there was a cultural homogeneity probably never seen before. The culture. Grunge became mainstream very quickly; everyone who had been ‘cool’ suddenly became ugly and over the top, and Kurt was the symbol of transgression. “

Another Porto Alegre child in ’91, Rogerio Maia Garcia, was intrigued by Nevermind’s vinyl artwork “Swimming Baby” (the album arguably heralded an era of visual iconography, as well as influence. musical), just before the music captivated him: “We were all listening to rock and metal, but Nevermind sounded totally different – like ‘normal kids’ playing at home: raw and very loud,” Garcia explains. . “It certainly opened our ears to the grunge scene; after Nevermind, bands like Soundgarden, Alice in Chains and Pearl Jam became well known in Brazil, and many children began to learn to play; in the early 90s in Porto Alegre, live music was losing dance music, but suddenly there were concerts by local bands every night. “He adds that established Brazilian bands such as Titas have also incorporated influence, working with Seattle producer Jack Endino for their own album Titanomaquia (1993).

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Under the Taliban, the thriving Afghan music scene moves towards silence http://afarin-rahmanifar.com/under-the-taliban-the-thriving-afghan-music-scene-moves-towards-silence/ http://afarin-rahmanifar.com/under-the-taliban-the-thriving-afghan-music-scene-moves-towards-silence/#respond Wed, 22 Sep 2021 14:48:45 +0000 http://afarin-rahmanifar.com/under-the-taliban-the-thriving-afghan-music-scene-moves-towards-silence/

By BERNAT ARMANGUE

September 22, 2021 GMT

KABUL, Afghanistan (AP) – A month after the Taliban took power in Afghanistan, the music is starting to calm down.

The last time the militant group ruled the country, in the late 1990s, they banned music altogether. So far this time, the government set up by the Taliban has not officially taken this step. But already, musicians fear a ban is coming, and some Taliban fighters on the ground have started enforcing the rules on their own, harassing musicians and concert halls.

Many wedding venues limit music at their gatherings. Musicians are afraid of performing. At least one reported that Taliban fighters at one of the many checkpoints around the capital smashed his instrument. Drivers silence their radios whenever they see a Taliban checkpoint.

In the alleys of Kharabat, a district of the old city of Kabul, families where music is a profession passed down from generation to generation are looking for ways to leave the country. The profession has already been hit hard by the collapse of the Afghan economy, as well as the coronavirus pandemic, and some families now too fearful to work are selling furniture to get by.

“The current situation is oppressive,” said Muzafar Bakhsh, a 21-year-old who has played in an alliance. His family had just sold some of their belongings at Kabul’s new flea market, Chaman-e-Hozari. “We keep selling them … so as not to starve,” said Bakhsh, whose late grandfather was Ustad Rahim Bakhsh, a famous ustad – or maestro – of classical Afghan music.

Afghanistan has a strong musical tradition, influenced by Iranian and Indian classical music. It also has a thriving pop music scene, adding electronic instruments and dance beats to more traditional beats. Both have flourished over the past 20 years.

When asked if the Taliban government would ban music again, spokesman Bilal Karimi told The Associated Press: “At the moment it is under consideration and when a final decision will be made. , the Islamic Emirate will announce it ”.

But concert halls are already feeling the pressure since the Taliban invaded Kabul on August 15.

Wedding halls are usually the scene of large gatherings with music and dance, usually separated between the male and female sections. In three rooms visited by the AP, staff said the same. Taliban fighters often show up, and although they haven’t yet objected to the music, their presence is intimidating. The musicians refuse to introduce themselves. In the male sections of weddings, the rooms no longer have live music or DJs. In the women’s section – where Taliban fighters have less access – sometimes female DJs still play.

Some karaoke lounges have closed. Others still face harassment. A lounge visited by the AP stopped karaoke but remained open, serving water pipes and playing recorded music. Last week, Taliban fighters showed up, smashed an accordion, and tore up signs and stickers referring to music or karaoke. A few days later, they returned and told the customers to leave immediately.

Many musicians apply for visas abroad.

In the family home of another ustad in Kharabat, everyone is ready to leave when they can. In one room, a group of musicians recently gathered, drinking tea and discussing the situation. They shared photos and videos of their performances around the world – Moscow, Baku, New Delhi, Dubai, New York.

“Musicians no longer have their place here. We have to leave. The love and affection of the past few years is gone, ”said a drummer, whose career spanned 35 years and who is the master of a leading music education center in Kabul. Like many other musicians, he spoke on condition of not being named, fearing retaliation from the Taliban.

Another musician in the room said the Taliban broke a keyboard worth $ 3,000 when they saw him in his car as he passed through a checkpoint. Others said they were shipping their most valuable instruments out of the country or hiding them. One had disassembled his tabla – a sort of drum – and hid the pieces in different places. Another buried his rebab, a stringed instrument, in his yard. Some said they were hiding instruments behind false walls.

One who has already managed to leave is Aryana Sayeed, a prominent female pop star who has also been a judge on the TV show “The Voice of Afghanistan”. Already accustomed to death threats from Islamist extremists, Sayeed decided to flee the day the Taliban took control of Kabul.

“I had to survive and be the voice of other women in Afghanistan,” said Sayeed, now in Istanbul. She said she is asking Turkish authorities to help other musicians leave her native country. “The Taliban are not friends of Afghanistan, they are our enemies. Only enemies would want to destroy your story and your music, ”she said.

At the Afghan National Institute of Music, most of the classrooms are empty. None of the teachers or the 350 students have returned since the resumption. The institute was once famous for its inclusiveness and has emerged as the face of a new Afghanistan. Now it is guarded by fighters from the Haqqani network, a Taliban ally considered a terrorist group by the United States.

Inside the institute, photos of playing boys and girls hang on the walls, dusty pianos lie in locked rooms, and some instruments have been stacked in a container on the school patio. Fighters guarding the site said they were awaiting orders from management on what to do with them.

“We’re not interested in listening to these things,” said one fighter, standing next to a set of dhambura, a traditional stringed instrument. “I don’t even know what these items are. Personally, I have never listened to them and that does not interest me.

In a classroom at the end of the hall, a Taliban fighter rested on a mattress while listening to a male voice sing on his cell phone, apparently one of the instrumentless religious hymns common to the group.

Back in Kharabat, Mohammed Ibrahim Afzali once ran the family musical instrument repair business. In mid-August, he puts away his tools, breaks the instruments left in the workshop and closes. Today, the 61-year-old sells crisps and snacks to help feed his family of 13.

“I made this little shop. God is merciful and we will find a piece of bread, ”he said.

___

Associated Press reporter Ayse Wieting in Istanbul contributed to this report.


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For families in Europe, ending the US travel ban is a new beginning http://afarin-rahmanifar.com/for-families-in-europe-ending-the-us-travel-ban-is-a-new-beginning/ http://afarin-rahmanifar.com/for-families-in-europe-ending-the-us-travel-ban-is-a-new-beginning/#respond Tue, 21 Sep 2021 17:18:30 +0000 http://afarin-rahmanifar.com/for-families-in-europe-ending-the-us-travel-ban-is-a-new-beginning/

LONDON – For Katie Wait, the coronavirus pandemic has been more than a year and a half of uncertainty. It also meant months apart from his parents, brother and extended family in Florida.

Missed birthdays. Milestones celebrated separately. Time together wasted.

“It’s been the most difficult year mentally and emotionally, when you really want your family to be there,” said Ms Wait, suddenly overwhelmed by tears. “It was tough.”

So, on Monday, she was one of many across Europe and the world who rejoiced when the Biden administration announced an 18-month travel ban from 33 countries, including Great Britain. Brittany, member states of the European Union, Brazil, China, India, Iran and South Africa, would be lifted.

The travel ban hadn’t been a mere inconvenience, for Ms Wait and countless others: it crushed jobs and destroyed opportunities and put an irremovable wall between them and their families or partners.